Tag Archives: wool

Animals in real life

My day starts and ends with feeding 3 orphaned animals and I watch them and pat them as I do it (as best I can holding two bottles)  We currently have Coco, Johnny the merino lambs and Turnbull the Angus bull and they live in our now animal nursery and I watch them for signs of disease, growth and any other conditions that may affect them.I noted this morning Turnbull is without his identifiable red collar, we know who he is and he isn’t likely to get out of the nursery for sometime, he is thriving and doing better since the lambs have arrived.

Coco is still in her coat as she is little and Johnny has taken to finishing his bottle and pushing Coco away to get more milk. This is farming in real life Turnbull will also push his way past both lambs if he finishes drinking first to get more milk, it’s a game of balance and quick sucking by the lambs now, other than this they have become good friends. Even the Golden Retriever makes friends with baby animals, the lambs think he is their mum, I can hear when he heads up to the chicken coup as the lambs run up the fence calling him.

goldie-meets-lambs-14-09-2016

Giving Johnny a lick whilst turnbull and Coco look on.

I know we see the pictures from the Royal Shows where all the animals look clean and are beautifully kept, they are for shows, that is what they are bred for. They are cared for, washed and in some cases blow driers are used to fluff up or down hair, so that you will find them attractive and see the breeder and either buy it or look for the progeny.

They are the show case of that farmers annual work, so you will buy the semen to impregnate your females with or the animal itself. They are also the show case of agriculture teachers who work with students and animals in schools to get them to understand farming, animal husbandry and farming enterprises. They pick the best of the best ways to show these animals and understand how upset students can be when it is taken off to have it’s carcass scored.

Animals in real life though, are always well cared for on most farms are not like that in real life, they live in grass so on some days the sheep can look green in the colour of their wool, they live on red dirt in other districts and throughout Australia so their wool can take on a red look. If it’s muddy they take on the colour of that dirt and mud, that is why wool is a widely sort after textile, as it’s washable, absorbs dyes and is easily cleaned.

I know who knew farmers were not roaming around paddocks making sure that animals were washed, dried and groomed? We are out in the farm (mostly the farmer is) checking on mis-mothering of animals, helping to birth animals and in the worst of cases having to euthanase them. He will sit with binoculars watching the rears of cows checking for size of birthing, to make sure that it happens as well as it should. He can tell the difference between a front or rear foot presentation and knows instinctively whether or not he will be required to pull. He is mostly successful with live births but sometimes stillborns are delivered.

We also have chooks with a rooster, which I don’t like, they become protective of the hens and can fly at you. The one we have currently jumps on a tin as soon as he sees me and I have gone into the pen waving a shovel at it, on one occasion I threw the scrap bucket at it as he flew at me and attacked me. I was lucky I was wearing jeans that day or he would have scratched my legs, stupidly I had to then walk back into the coup and collect the bucket, now I keep the shovel handy, my Melbourne niece and nephew were a bit horrified at this.

This is farming, this is animals and we are all part of the kingdom that needs to share and get along, be it with or without a shovel in my case with the rooster or shoving past 2 little lambs to get more milk. Life is not always about looking the best, thinnest or being the smartest, it is about existing with each other to enjoy the opportunities in front of you with others.

 

 

 

 

 

Vegans this slogan is a joke….. Right?

no category for stupid

I can not say any more than this picture says.

I applaud vegans, I think the effort they put into avoiding meat eating is fantastic, and I know there are many vegans who do not think less of meat eaters. To have a campaign that is an outright lie, there would be many vegans who would be as outraged and as embarrassed as I am at this.

We shear sheep, we love our sheep but they are NOT killed when shorn, in fact many people don’t even eat sheep as they are the breeders and are important for wool and producing lambs and rams that may keep the wool flock growing and also become part of a farm.

As a farmer, we don’t slaughter things because we feel we have to, we don’t even cull kangaroos that eat our crop, as a city girl I have learnt so many things and I will go and watch them being slaughtered for human consumption. I make sure the food processors are ethical and humanely do it. I have banned cattle prods from our property, all our dogs are muzzled when working.

To the vegans and people who believe this campaign, contact me, ask me questions but do not believe this, it lowers peoples intelligence. Tell me what you think? Ask me the hard questions email me robyn@bullysbeef.com.au

Shearers and Farmers Agree

I want to thank you all for your words of encouragement and the positive words on the face book page and my blog. I think it is vital we all have a voice for our animals and our trades, there are very few farmers in Australia and the world that advocate cruelty to animals, in any way shape or form. Not to say that we are all perfect we are not, but deliberate attempts by organisations to show the rogues (there are those in every industry) the randomness of the trades, the bullies and those that need education all differ and high light the fact that we need to support even these people.

We can take stock and look back now at what PETA has done and thank them, we can thank them for the unity they have created amongst us all. We need to thank them for the fact that they have put our industry in the fore front of people’s minds to defend it. we can thank them for highlighting how ignorance and discrimination can create change for the better.

We are better off with them than without them and I mean that, for if they had not been so determined in their lies, fake lambs, vegan spokes person (nothing wrong with being a vegan – though to a meat eater it’s a different life style choice) and tried to con Australia into believing that the wool industry is full of horrific practices we would not be having the support of Australia and beyond. Groups such as PETA can do some much good, like expose puppy farms, – take photos of those cruel people who deliberately cage dogs for profit, close that sector down.

PETA we invite you to come to our farm next time we are shearing, I will actually pen a letter to them – an open letter and post it and wait for their response. I hope they do take me up on the offer, in fact I say why don’t we all do it, I am happy to write this and will share it with you. Lets get them to film us and our teams of workers and make them understand the frustration, the heat, the barking dogs and the work makes long days and frayed tempers but it doesn’t make shearing the skin off sheep and leaving them to die in agony as their picture depicts.

My friends at www.baabaabrew.com.au in NSW property Goongirwarrie sent me a picture of one of their Merino Rams being shorn – how hard does this look?

Shearing the Ram

Shearing the Ram

Australian Wool and Sheep Industry

It’s funny (not funny really) that since the myth has been debunked about the treatment of our sheep and lambs during shearing, there has been no word or apology from PETA. I have started the facebook page, requested photos and pictures and I live the feedback it is getting, so much so I may even have to create a webpage. In the 5 days I have had it open there have been over 2000 likes, keep spreading the word.

What it shows us is there are an enormous amount of farmers, families and shearers who take so much pride in their work, the industry and each other it really is heartening to see. Keep those videos coming – I am more than happy to promote good high quality shearers and their work.To the shearers out there, send me your details or a picture of yourself – so that we can promote it through the page. It really is an industry unless you are in it, no one knows how tough it is, how respected most of you are by those that employ you, how frustrated we are that we can’t get you (you are all so busy) especially if the word of mouth says how good a team you are and how good your skills are. If you have a show coming up jump on the facebook page (click here and it will take you too it)  or email me robyn@bullysbeef.com.au and I’ll put up an events page where people can see where you’re doing displays or competitions get the public out there supporting us.

I know there are teams of you that travel overseas for demonstrations, come to country shows and have competitions and put hours into your craft. Shearing the wool off the sheeps back is exactly that, it provides an income for families, including your own, it provides the industry with high quality wool for national and International sale. It is used for many different purposes and mostly puts wool on bodies all over the world.

Mr Barnaby Joyce MP said it best really so I have copied the you tube video for you to listen to. Whilst I don’t subscribe to name calling, it would be nice if someone from PETA would admit that the treatment of lambs during shearing does not produce the kind of image that they have displayed.  https://youtu.be/sPYdio-hCP0

I have also received a spiel about a cottage industry (Australian) of course that uses aged sheep manure, bags it and people buy it to add liquid and it turns in to 100% natural fertilizer for their gardens. Not only do they produce wool but they have turned what could be years of poop under the shearing shed into a business. Their fund raising idea is fabulous, get on over to their website and have a look, promote it on your page and get the industry talking about all of the great things it does. They call themselves Baa Baa Brew, great name too.

Baa Baa Brew

Baa Baa Brew

Autumn

Most Farmers look to the skies more often than is normal, I only ever use to take note of this when I was travelling to work or getting dressed in the morning, the only time I ever wanted a long-range forecast was when I was going to be away for 3 or more days for work. I introduced my farmer to the world of computers early on in our relationship as a great way to be in contact and without a doubt I can tell you his favourite pages include ones on the weather, farming articles from various publications, sites that sell farming equipment and a couple of the board sheet and tabloid media papers. I think the weather is one that frustrates him the most.

We have moved into the Autumn in Australia and we are looking for rain, where we live is dry and we have experienced a record-breaking summer with more days over 43 degree Celsius than one should ever wish to experience. Just because the weather is hot does not mean that farmers have a break, there is stock to move into the shade, waters to check to ensure all animals remain hydrated and troughs to fix should he find them empty. I have had to help on occasions, the livelihood of our stock is far more important than being our in the sun for a few hours.

With Autumn most farmers are looking for that break in the season, as am I, it is a worrying time of year, feedstock is running low, animals are beginning to look to moving paddocks for a change of scenery. We are looking to some decent rain, the break in the season means many things to farmers, time to sow the crops hoping the follow-up rain will come, time to ‘join’ animals for the next years off-spring. It’s a time when it’s not hot and more things can be done, it’s one of my favourite times of the year, I must admit I like winter best, I love the rain and the cold over the heat and stifling hot days of summer. I also do look to the skies at this time of year, I wish for rain to wet our parched paddocks, and this year to wet the ground that was burnt by fire. It is a time for renewal, regrowth and less stress.

It is our 7th wedding anniversary today and despite the fact I could get a gift of wool, copper and modern ‘desk set’ I wish for none, I wish for rain. ….