Tag Archives: Meat

What are you doing with your defrosted Meat this Christmas?

It’s a busy time of the year and you grab some meat out of the freezer with a planned meal in mind, defrost it, something happens you place it on a plate and pop it into the fridge and leave it. You don’t want to waste it so you plan using it 24 hours after defrosting, then it goes into day 3 – can you still use it? Once meat is thawed, it is subject to bacterial growth. The amount of time you have to cook meat varies depending on how it was thawed. There are three ways you can safely thaw meat. If you need to thaw something quick, you can use the microwave. You can thaw meat in the refrigerator with some planning ahead. You can also thaw meat in cold water. Microwave and cold water thawing require immediate cooking and refrigerator thawing varies by a few days, depending on the type of meat.

Microwave Thawing

Meat can be safely thawed in the microwave but you should remove all plastic wrap and foam trays before beginning the defrost process, place it on a dish or plate and this will collect any of the water that leaves the meat as it thaws. Most microwaves have a thawing button – use this as it will be a lower power setting than anything else, if your microwave doesn’t have one use low power so that the meat is heated more evenly. After thawing in the microwave, you should cook the meat immediately in case portions of the meat became too warm and begin to cook. This creates an ideal environment for the growth of bacteria, especially bacteria that was already present before the thawing process.

Refrigerator Thawing

You can thaw meat in the refrigerator with some advanced planning because it takes some time. For example, a frozen turkey takes 24 hours to thaw for every 2.2 kilos or 5lbs. of weight. half a kilo or 1 lb. of ground meat (mince) or chicken takes 24 hours, perhaps longer if the temperature in your refrigerator is below the optimum temperature of 8 degrees Celsius or 40 degrees F. According to Food Safety guidelines, ground meat (mince), poultry and seafood needs to be cooked within a day or two after thawing in the refrigerator. Pieces of red meat like beef steaks, lamb chops and pork chops or roasts should be cooked within three to five days of thawing. It is OK to refreeze meat without cooking that has been thawed in the refrigerator, but some quality may be jeopardized.

Cold Water Thawing

Meat can be safely thawed in cold water but never in warm water or on the counter top because the meat gets too warm, which is ideal for bacterial growth. To thaw meat in cold water, place it in a leak-proof bag, submerge it in cold water, and change the water every 30 minutes so it stays cold. This method is half a kilo or 1 lb. of meat could thaw in an hour; maybe less. A few kilo/ pounds may thaw in two to three hours. Estimate about 30 minutes a kilo / pound for a whole chicken or turkey. Cook meat thawed in cold water immediately, even before you refreeze it.

Cooking Frozen

You can cook frozen meat without thawing it if you run out of time to thaw. Plan on cooking the meat at least 50 percent longer than if it were in a thawed state.

The rule of nose is, if it smells or has an unpleasant odour – throw it out, do not feed it to animals as they too can get sick from eating bad meat.

What are you doing with your defrosted meat this Christmas?

Baling hay

I do find things on the farm that are interesting and though many people think having a big tractor can do anything (well I use to) but the tractor is only a tool to get things done, it lifts, pulls, drives, tows and lifts to name a few. But in order to get things done you need the attachments much like a mix master to have a complete system.

We don’t have a baler, we employ sub contractors in to do this. They work hard, sitting and driving for hours and hours while the moisture is good to bale the hay that was raked and is lying on the ground. They can do 20 hours days if the weather conditions are right and they have job after job to do.

He came all day and left after we went to bed, we helped him move his Ute so that when he finished he didn’t have a 10 kilometre walk back to his Ute to go home in when he moved paddocks after dark. we bale the hay so that we can keep it and feed it out to our stock to align with our farming practices, which is to keep everything as natural as possible.

Farming for us is a whole of life from birth to death for our animals, the farm has been developed to consider nature, the environment and the animals. This makes it a business enterprise that is sustainable, clean and green. Our meat reflects the care and planning the farmer does with all the decisions that he makes.

Does Fresh & Frozen Meat weigh the same?

I think about this often, well most times I am defrosting meat and my husband the farmer tell me that frozen and fresh meat weigh the same. I have always thought that they don’t, to me frozen meat feels heavier even after taking the packaging away. If you buy meat fresh one normally buys freezer bags and puts it away or if you buy meat in thermoform (supermarket packaging) you can normally find a pad at the bottom to soak up any moisture.

I have weighed meat fresh and frozen to discover there is a difference even a minimal one, so if you are buying frozen meat and they weigh it and price it on the frozen product you may find you are paying for the water in the meat. Thus up to 1/3 more can be frozen water and myoglobin, which is the by product of fresh meat that many people mistake for ‘blood’.

There is nothing wrong with purchasing fresh or frozen as most people tend to buy extra to freeze later anyway. There is many different types of packaging and I’ll go into those next blog. If the meat looks green, smells like sulphur then take it back, washing and drying will not rid of this smell, lamb has a stronger smell but should not smell like sulphur.

Remember when taking meat out of any packaging give it a quick rinse under water, or rain water to wash off any plastic products from the wrap when in thermoform. Rub and rinse when taking meat out of cryovac package as meat can absorb the smell and can taste like the packaging leaving the meat not pleasant to eat. Remember to pat dry and do not use if the meat smells off. It does not need you to soak it, do not mix meats and or put it with poultry, this will spread bacteria and can make you sick.

If you can buy meat from your butcher or local farm paddock to plate outlets, they will not only give you the best quality (even if a little more pricey) they can give you good tips on ways to cook and how to freeze and thaw meat. If you buy grass-fed over grain-fed, they will not only smell different they will taste different.

If you have any questions you want answered on any topic meat related please feel free to email me and I’ll do my best to answer. admin@bullysbeef.com.au

beef

 

Vegans this slogan is a joke….. Right?

no category for stupid

I can not say any more than this picture says.

I applaud vegans, I think the effort they put into avoiding meat eating is fantastic, and I know there are many vegans who do not think less of meat eaters. To have a campaign that is an outright lie, there would be many vegans who would be as outraged and as embarrassed as I am at this.

We shear sheep, we love our sheep but they are NOT killed when shorn, in fact many people don’t even eat sheep as they are the breeders and are important for wool and producing lambs and rams that may keep the wool flock growing and also become part of a farm.

As a farmer, we don’t slaughter things because we feel we have to, we don’t even cull kangaroos that eat our crop, as a city girl I have learnt so many things and I will go and watch them being slaughtered for human consumption. I make sure the food processors are ethical and humanely do it. I have banned cattle prods from our property, all our dogs are muzzled when working.

To the vegans and people who believe this campaign, contact me, ask me questions but do not believe this, it lowers peoples intelligence. Tell me what you think? Ask me the hard questions email me robyn@bullysbeef.com.au

The Big Issue

In life we have choices to do many things and most of us know are taught to share and to give. We share toys with siblings and with friends, most of us share hand me down clothes, which teaches us how to give and take. As we grow older we are asked to give to charities by donating money, goods or time. Time by way of volunteering is incredibly valuable, by being taught to give we are taught respect and self worth.

I was invited to the Big Lunch 5 years back by a dear friend who is a writer for the magazine “the big issue”. so we went, it was fantastic, in the Adelaide Central markets, food donated by the stall holders and prepared by the head Chefs at the Adelaide Hilton Hotel. Wines donated by a local South Australian Winery , Yalumba, splitrock waters, Mountain fresh juice, Vale beers, HeyDayButter and Lobe cider. fantastic.

My husband the farmer, said about the meat surely we can do better and from that day onwards we have. We donate either our grass-fed beef or lamb to feed 300 people so that all monies go directly to support the homeless and places women in distress in jobs. This year we did paddock fed chicken, lamb and invited a girlfriend to donate eartheggs to the dessert. All local Upper South east produce, delivered and prepared by well known chefs.

The-Big-Issue

This year we were joined by 460 guests 40 of them ours and I was surprised to hear that not many people had heard about  The Big Issue. Where half the proceeds go to the seller of the magazine and it helps to change their life.

Our food was a hit, I noticed the lamb was disappearing fast and I had to go to another table to get a serving for myself and the farmer, it made our hearts swell with pride. Our beautiful grass-fed Dorper lamb prepared by the Hilton Chef Dan Fleming and team and served to 460 people who loved it as much as they did by attending (and us). The paddock fed chicken by a local grower Little Greenbush Poultry   was also a huge hit (donated by us as well)

Nothing tastes as fresh as home grown, no hormones, antibiotics, prepared and given with love to help others who need it.

How do you find your happiness? is it sitting at the table sharing a meal like we did?

If you see the Big Issue sellers – buy the magazine it has great articles and know you’re giving to someone who is doing the best for themselves that they can

How to cook cube roll

Today we are moving into lots of gourmet cooking at home. Paleo is forefront of many consumers, grass-fed and paddock fed are common names that get blogged about talked about and asked for when purchasing meat. Did you know most farmers in Australia are grass fed, that is a standard mode of practice and those that feedlot do so as there is also a good market for this meat. All practices in Australia are monitored and all animals are treated with care and dignity.

We can supply standard cuts and full set natural cuts, which is good if you want to buy in bulk. The cube roll is a popular cut but if cooked incorrectly can become “chewy” and if cutting into steaks – cut them thin and tenderise them like your grandmother or mother did in the 70’s . A quick hit on each side with a hammer will soften the meat and make it tender.

Cube steak is also known as tenderized steak or “minute steak.” There are many ways to cook cube steak, including baking, barbequing, stewing, stuffing and serving it in roll-ups. The cube roll is a mix of the top round or sirloin steak, depending upon your butcher.

Send us your favourite recipe, we’d love to publish it. I’ll post mine later, with a Paleo influence. Either way grass-fed or grain-fed in Australia, the meat is always of good quality.

Enjoy your day and if you are looking for a supplier use the contact form.