Tag Archives: family

Turnbull

Turn bull

apologies for taking the Youtube down but it played porn youtubes after ours – I must  work out how to upload from our youtube channel.

Here he is : the new baby bull, who after much debate over red wine, a bonfire, family and friends. He is an orphan and needs nourishment until he is old enough to go back into the paddocks. We posted it out on facebook, twitter and on Instagram and got dozens of great names but the one that appealed to the farmer was “Turnbull” named directly after our Prime Minister here in Australia.

He is very placid, comes to the gate when he see’s me with the bottle and drinks till there is no milk left in the bottle, he only allows me to pet him whilst feeding then he becomes aloof and wanders off to chew grass. Our vegetable patch or ex vegetable patch has been an animal nursery for a few years now. It is close to the house and they are protected from the elements and dogs, fed and cared for until they go back to the mobs.

This is the reality of farming and life, animals and people die for various reasons and those left behind (hopefully) get embrace, valued and reared with love to return to a community that will look after them or rear them till the next one comes along

Do you buy in bulk or do you buy in standard cuts?

How do you shop? is it a thing to think about on a daily basis? do you plan daily meals at meal times and stand at the fridge door like me, are you budget and weight conscious and plan and make meals on your spare days so the family know what to get out and assist you with if you are a working person?

It is a known fact that people who plan and cook meals weekly lose weight and maintain a high level of health, as these people are disciplined enough to carry through plans and not buy out of the budget and meal options. Taking fully prepared lunch to work or school is also the sign of an organised person who is not only budget aware but health aware, one never sees someone bring in hot chips and gravy to reheat in the microwave or do you?

The idea is to plan your meals, write your shopping list and set about creating your new healthy organised self. Plan the meat meals and decide what you are buying, red meat, beef, lamb, kangaroo, pink meat pork and white meat, chicken and fish. It is not necessary to buy and precook veg’s these can be done daily if you need to shop, but never shop when you are hungry as you make bad choices. Put down the oven pizza or frozen / non frozen burger and buy the grass fed, organic steak or hamburgers. The fat content is less and you will feel much more satisfied with the dinner you are preparing for yourself and family.

Here is the healthy option always try and buy local – ask if you are unsure where the meat comes from, most supermarkets have in-house butchers in Australia. If it reads 100% grass fed or organic pay the extra it will be worth it for the health benefits of having the producer who worked hard to bring the best possible meat to your plate. Look for ours, we are proud of our meat.

sticker

Do you buy the cuts or in bulk so that you have options for more than 1 meal ? Of the eight main sections, or primal cuts, of a steer, seven—the chuck (shoulder), the rib (rib section), the plate and flank (underbelly), the short loin (back section), the sirloin (hip), and the round (hindquarter)—yield individual cuts that are tender enough to be sold as steaks. The rib, short loin, and sirloin are the source of most premium steak house cuts, but tender and flavorful steaks also come from other parts of the steer; the chuck, in particular, is the source of a number of excellent, and inexpensive, steaks.

Tell me do you prepare daily or weekly menu’s? I do daily and perhaps I need to set about and do weekly meal planner and see how much I can save with time, effort and satisfaction.

Left Overs

I love eating the Little Greenbush Poultry Chicken I find it amazing and there is so much meat on the bird that they are good value for money. Head over to their page and like it. For a family that want to provide good healthy food choices then this is what you need to look for when purchasing a paddock fed meat bird. It will not be thin like the others, as they are not crowded against each other fighting to get food. They will be wider than others, paddock fed get to roam around hectares of land, eating natural bugs, scratching for worms and this produces more meat on the breast and legs.

We had left over chicken the other night and I decided to pull out the pie maker, a sheet of puff pastry, frozen peas, fresh mushrooms, spring onions, chicken stock, 2 tablespoons of plain flour and a 1/4 cup of chicken cream. All of the ingredients I made sure was local or at the least South Australian, as producers we find it important to support other producers having a go.I made the short crust pastry as well.

The chicken was cold so I pulled it apart, I put the peas, chopped spring onion, chopped mushrooms into a bowl. Heated a fry pan put 2 tablespoons of plain flour 1 cup of chicken stock and 1/4 cup of cream mixed them till it thickened and poured it on top of the chicken and stirred it through.

If any one want the recipe please email me, it took approx an hour due to having the pastry sit in the fridge for 30 minutes. admin@bullysbeef.com.au

 

Meat for Meals

We are looking today for the ‘fast food’ the quick meal option to feed our families. In most households the end of the day is not welcome relief from work, it is sometimes fuller than a days work. There are children, homework, study, book work, housework to name but a few ‘work’ things ones does when they come home from ‘work’. For most people it doesn’t stop, no longer are families depicted by a male figure with his feet up, paper in hand and with a pipe in his mouth, the ‘lady’ of the house dressed in refinery, lipstick on and smiling and no sign of children those days (thankfully) are gone.

There is always something to do and food choices to make, nights are about sustenance given to families by way of the evening meal and in most cases lunches the next day. Here is where all this running around and getting home from work doesn’t mean stopping, it means someone in the house needs to make a meal decision.

What does one cook when they are busy, sometimes it is much easier to pull in and purchase ready cooked meals but are they really satisfying? Over my time being married to a farmer I have come to appreciate a good cut of meat and well cooked meal. Our meat is pasture fed so it is lean, tasty and delicious, but even with my freezer full of meat I do sometimes ask, what do you feel like for dinner? The response I get is “anything as long as I am with you” a reference back to our courting days where I made a comment that he never commented on my meals. To be honest though I did tell him “I don’t cook” which he took as “I can’t cook” so when I would arrive at the farm (300km drive) I would be greeted with a drink and a meal. Which was great he is a good chef, but then like everything else it becomes the same so I started to cook.

Now it is 85% my responsibility and he can tell when I have had enough as I won’t cook, but going back to simple easy meals for families and busy evenings has become the monotonous decisions of what to cook in the evening. I have started a program where I am cooking with the contents of the pantry and not replacing it as I go. We have a big pantry and I can never find anything in it.

Meat is a great form of protein and is gluten-free, fat-free and abides by the heart foundation requirements for low GI. These are all the things we are looking for in our diets, if we eat a 150g lean piece of meat in our main meal then we have ticked all of the boxes. I always do green things steamed, potato of some kind, gravy or a mustard condiment to add taste. This  sounds so simple doesn’t it but some days it is far from it, it is an effort to defrost, cook to the right temperature, boil without burning the bottom of the saucepan – we currently have 4 dogs with 6 saucepans dog food bowls from attempts at rice and forgotten ‘mashed potatoes’.

Rump is a good cut for a family meal, just don’t over cook it otherwise it can be too tough, fillet is the steak to eat but can expensive when looking to feed the family but nice for a romantic meal for two, blade steak is also a fantastic cut and good for BBQ, BBQ meat is only for BBQ, it may be tough upon arrival to the butcher, supermarket and needs to be grilled to make it tender and edible. But in buying for BBQ buy good meats if you can as they will taste better and be tender.

We as agriculturalists who provide meat for human consumption are highly concentrated on sustainability and nutrition. We provide our animals with natural grasses to eat and limit any exposure to unnecessary humans and grow our crops to feed the stock. Our farming practices are humane, anti-biotic and growth hormone free. Meat science can demonstrate that beef from such grass-fed systems compared to intensive feedlots production systems contain elevated concentrations of vitamin A, vitamin E, increased levels of omega-3, a more desirable omega-3:omega-6 ratio, and increased levels of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), all with favorable biological effects on human health.

Meals are about sustenance, togetherness, comfort and time. Eating a piece of meat will provide children and adults with energy, alertness and satisfaction for longer periods of time, over something which can be shop bought and ‘fast’. Our foods standards are arguably the ‘golden standard’ of the world and are envied and copied by others. In reaching for that chocolate bar, think of the quick fix versus a slice of ham from the deli, the hunger pains will arrive sooner if you eat the chocolate along with the additional calories. Try a small skewer of lamb with a tzatziki dressing

moroccan lamb

Snacks with 100 Calories or less

Meats & Other Protein Foods

  • 2 ounces or 56 grams of lean roast beef or boiled ham
  • 4 ounces or 113 grams or turkey breast
  • 4 ounces or 113 grams smoked salmon
  • 3 ounces or 85 grams tuna (packed in water)
  • 2 ounces or 56 grams  tuna (packed in water) with 1 teaspoon low-fat mayonnaise added
  • 3 sardines packed in water
  • 3 thin slices of lunch meat 50 grams
  • 7 small shrimp
  • 1 chicken or turkey hot dog without the bun
  • 2 tofu dogs without the bun
  • 1 ounce or 28 grams beef jerky
  • 1 ounce or 28 grams  turkey pepperoni
  • 1 egg (hard-cooked, scrambled or fried)
  • ¾ cup egg substitute
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter – no biscuit or slice of bread
  • 4 tablespoons humus (chickpeas) – no biscuit or bread

Chocolates – check out the limitations –

  • ½ cup fat-free chocolate pudding
  • 15 chocolate covered raisins
  • 1 snack size candy bar
  • 4 Hershey® Kisses
  • 5 Ghirardelli® Milk Chocolate Drops
  • 2 Mrs. Fields® Decadent Chocolates
  • 2 slices Terry’s® Chocolate Orange
  • 4 Andes® Mints
  • 3 Nestle® After Eight Mints
  • 25 milk chocolate M&M’s®
  • 9 peanut M&M’s®
  • 1/5 Toblerone® bar
  • 9 Tootsie Roll Midgets®
  • 2 chocolate chip cookies (2-inch diameter)
  • 2 reduced-fat Oreo® cookies
  • 5 chocolate graham crackers
  • 1 Skinny Cow® Fat Free Fudge Bar
  • 1 Nestle Butterfinger® Stixx
  • 1 Whole Foods Market Two-Bite Brownie
  • 1 Healthy Choice® Mocha Fudge Swirl Bar

 

Sunday night is Spag night

Well it is either seen as the end of the week, the beginning of the week or the middle depending upon the job you do and the way you see the world this is called a Sunday. Some religions use the Sunday to encourage rest and prayer where others use a Saturday. It doesn’t really matter, what matters is how you see it, enjoy it and spend your time.

When children were younger it was the end of a busy sport, family and friend filled weekend and the day where washing, homework, church and generally preparing for the working week was enjoyed. It was the ‘slack day’ where in winter ironing was done with relish, the only other person I know who enjoys ironing is my friend Kate Swaffer, we share this love, I as a farm girl miss it, farmer in the house does not need his work clothes ironed and as I never ironed sheets or anything like that I now don’t have the need.

What I do have is still the need to eat, we would make Sunday night if not with family having a beef or lamb roast would have spaghetti Bolognaise. When children were younger I would put vegetables in so finely chopped up that it was denied that they were in-fact eaten, along with other things such as cracked pepper, paprika and onion. I would always use good beef mince, it is relatively cheap and can be purchased anywhere in the quantity amount that you want. Sometimes to mix it up we would use thin spaghetti pasta, but the favourite when she was little was thick, then we moved on to fettuccine. We would also make home-made garlic bread, where we would buy a bread stick, cut it butter it and wrap in AL foil and cook it.

Now days when I do it, I put red wine, olives and anything else that take my fancy. The good thing about home-made spag bol is that kids love their own parents, we all seem to have a different way of cooking it, adding ingredients but one thing that unites kids all over the world is that when taking them out they will at least eat a restaurant bowl of spaghetti bolognaise. I shall post my recipe in recipes, what’s your favourite ingredient? It is a family secret or something you developed to add taste or to get the children to eat it. I make enough now that I make lasagna for the next night or lasagna cups for single serves.

spaghetti-1