Valentine’s Hit or Miss

Well don’t all the best laid plans go astray?? There I was so proud of my pre planning and purchasing of condiments and all things for dinner, I even bought nice smelling candle and outdoor candle holder (lucky that was) All I needed to do about 6pm was defrost the rump steak, it was all going well till 4pm when we had a 40 mils or 1.5 inches of rain which was desperately needed to replenish the rain water tanks that had been drained at the property fire in December – but what it did do as well was cut the power from 6pm..

What to do, complete the prep in daylight, prepare all the candles in the house and ready the table so by nightfall nothing to do other than defrost the meat. I go to the freezer pull out the rump – it is dark so torches and candle light are what I am using to see things light the BBQ. We have one of the modern ones which have a rack above the plate and the hood closes – great place to defrost meat in a blackout.

But how to cook the oysters, I abandoned the idea of natural with lime and wasabi so I go the cooked option of Kilpatrick and I have horseradish dip, wasabi and parmesan cheese. I place all of the oysters on the rack and close the lid, the plate is warm so I place the steak which is now scotch fillet (didn’t pick rump in the dark) and the cut bacon (for oysters on the plate to cook slowly). I cover 6 with Kilpatrick sauce and the other six with horseradish dip, a dob of wasabi & parmesan cheese close the lid and let cook for 5 minutes. I take the scotch fillet off and place in al foil in the BBQ on the unlit plate and put all the oysters combined onto another plate and serve.

We have candle light every where but it is hot, humid and dark. There are bugs falling into the candle and all the cats (we have 3 cats) come out to join us. The dogs (we have 3 working dogs) are placed in their kennels and Pete the Golden retriever lies on the ground panting. The Oysters with a glass of ‘sparkling’ are beautiful and we enjoy them together. We pull the salad bowl close and he cuts the mouth-watering meat places it into the salad and I add the dressing (check recipes for details) We argue as he wants to keep the thin layer of fat on the meat and add it to the salad I want to feed it to Pete, I win, Pete gets a treat and I pour the juice from the meat into the Thai sauce I made before pouring it onto the salad, More bubbles and food to be followed up by strawberries & dipping chocolate.

Sadly earlier that day I realised I had left the strawberries in a fridge in town and it being a 300 km one way trip I hope they enjoyed them, I have peaches and nectarines so I cut them and we eat them. Perfect outdoor picnic by candle light and great company for valentine’s day.

For my American friends who are now asking what is Scotch Fillet? In Australia & New Zealand it is known as Scotch Fillet out of these countries it is known as Rib Eye or ribeye steak obviously from the rib section. A rib steak is a beef steak sliced from the rib primal of a beef animal, with rib bone attached. In the United States, the term rib eye steak is used for a rib steak with the bone removed; however in some areas, and outside the U.S., the terms are often used interchangeably. The rib eye or “ribeye” was originally, as the name implies, the center best portion of the rib steak, without the bone.

In Australia, “ribeye” is used when this cut is served with the bone in. With the bone removed, it is called a “Scotch fillet” instead.

It is one of the more flavorful cuts of beef, due to the muscle getting a lot of exercise during its life, unlike the tenderloin. Its marbling of fat makes this very good for slow roasting and it also goes well on a grill cooked to any degree. The meat when fresh is pinkish red and very tender, it is hard to ‘ruin’ this cut but over cooking can make it tough and tasteless, the trick is to grill each side for 5 minutes or more cover in aluminium foil to let it rest for up to 5 minutes, there should be juices in the aluminium foil when opened even if you like it well done.

scotch fillet

 

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